This is one of a series of posts documenting my daily activities as a Resources Librarian at University of Wolverhampton, UK, as part of the Library Day in the Life project.

I decided not to blog yesterday, as most of my day was taken up with family activities (Monday and Tuesday are non-library days for me anyway). I did do a couple of library profession related activities though: completed and submitted my application for a student place at a conference, and emailed my newly appointed dissertation supervisor (more on this in a future post, exciting!).

Today was a late night librarian shift for me (although it’s only until 7.45pm). I work late every other Wednesday, and don’t tend to start work on these days until 12-1pm. I had a bit of a lazy morning (always a treat!), and finished reading the Non-Designer’s Design Book (highly recommended, although not read the second book on type yet) before setting off for work at 10.45am.

Due to timings, I took the public bus route into work (I usually get the University shuttle but it only runs once an hour). I spent the journey in my usual way – listening to music, tweeting, and reading. Today I had some dissertation related reading (library marketing journal articles) with me so I read a couple of those during my three bus trip.

I got to work at about 12.45pm (following a brief visit to Tesco to grab some food for later) and spent the next half hour or so catching up with colleagues on anything I’ve missed. One of the drawbacks of working part-time is the amount of information you miss out on whilst you’re not in work, so a lot of my first day back each week is spent catching up on and responding to emails, and finding out about changes or developments I need to know about verbally (plus the obligatory what people got up to at the weekend although it seems a long time ago!). In fact, most of the day today was spent catching up and responding to emails – something I’ve noticed is people seem to have longer strings of email conversations at the beginning of the week, or maybe it’s just my colleagues!

I helped out with a few enquiries (face to face and phone), checked in new books that had arrived since Monday, and prepared for an induction I was taking at 3.30pm. My manager had also asked me to find out if any other Universities loan equipment through the library management system on behalf of academic schools, so I asked on the Twitter and got lots of replies really quickly which I forwarded on to him. It was yet again great to demonstrate how useful Twitter can be.

I went to my induction at 3.30, and found that there were only two students – was a good job though really as the room I’d booked was occupied. I took them on a whistle stop tour of the building, and then logged onto a PC to show them the basics of OPAC and our major health databases. Despite being new students on this course, both had studied with us before so they were clued up on most of the basics which was great. I updated them on some of our newer services, and made sure they knew how to get help if they need it later on in their course.

Then it was back to the office where I had a message to call back a colleague on another campus. It was about a cataloguing request I’d made last week about the Teaching Practice collection, and as always seems to be the case, it’s not quite so straight forward as I initially thought. However, between us, I think we managed to establish the ideal situation, and with a bit of give and take I think we’ll hopefully get somewhere near to what I’d like.

Then it was time for a quick snack before the late night desk shift. It’s the first week of the semester so I had thought it might be busier tonight but I only had three in person enquiries – two of which were from the same person. I booked study skills sessions for a couple of students, and spent the rest of my evening responding to emails, mainly about reference management (we support EndNote and EndNote Web).

I was following the Apple news too, and was periodically checking TechCrunch and Twitter to see what exactly Apple are releasing and if it has any implications for libraries. I’m looking forward to seeing the iPad, although like many I think the name will have to be a grower! I was pleasantly surprised to see the price (a lot less than I had expected), and can certainly see that it would be useful for roaming (something I mentioned in an earlier post). I can also imagine that it will be a pretty affordable option for students, and particularly useful if they can get a good network deal in the UK. I can certainly see it could be useful for those living in halls – keep the keyboard dock in their room for writing assignments, and carry the iPad around to make notes in lectures and communicate whilst out and about.

My boyfriend kindly collected me from work at the end of my shift and cooked me a lovely tea whilst I was writing this blog post, and now I’m off to watch a bit of TV and do some cross stitch before bed.

I’m hoping tomorrow I can get some real work done now the emails are down to a manageable level! I’ll try to take some photos too, was planning to today but completely forgot so might edit this tomorrow to add an appropriate picture.

  • I’d not thought about the potential uses of the iPad for students in lectures. I’m still not convinced that it can replace a laptop for writing, even with the dock.

    For me I’d love to have it in my bag when I’m walking around, but have it instead of my iPhone. Then to make phone calls I’ve got a bluetooth connected headset / smaller handset that … See morefits in my pocket. It’s an iPhone / iPod Touch replacement, I don’t think there is room for both. And the lack of multitasking is a bit of a dealbreaker. I use my MacBook like they were using the iPad, but I do all of those things at the same time. Watching movies, browsing the web and chatting on MSN all happen at the same time.

    • Interesting, I quite like the idea of connecting it to a bluetooth headset to use as a phone, although I’m not sure if it would be practical in many situations – even my iPhone is a bit too big to fit in some of my girlier clutch bags!

      I think it could be useful for students to use to take out and about, although without some sort of stand I don’t imagine it would be good on tables – great in the library though (I prefer relaxed atmospheres with comfier seating and think it would be great for this sort of area).

      I agree about multitasking, this is a major disadvantage (says she with numerous software open and 17 Firefox tabs!).