Man with megaphone

I started this blog post in a conference break at the JISC Future of Research conference. I wasn’t actually at the conference (it was held in London); I was in my office in Birmingham following along using various event amplification tools.

I hadn’t come across the term event amplification (i.e. amplifying the event beyond the physical location, for example by using livestreaming or Twitter) until quite recently, through Brian Kelly’s blog and a subsequent discussion I had with him. However, I have been involved in event amplification in a number of different ways before. Event amplification (although I didn’t term it as that) has been an important consideration of mine both as an attendee, an organiser, and a remote participant.

It’s a bit of a hot topic at the moment, particularly within my network of library and information professionals (guess it’s in the name really – we want to improve access to information wherever possible including information from events). Most events I hear about I can find out more information from Twitter and blogs, and more and more often there is an organised presence (e.g. an “official” event Twitter account or hashtag, live blogging or live streaming).

I’ve even come across someone who is doing this as part of their living; Kirsty Pitkin (@eventamplifier) helps amplify various events and was responsible for the amplification of the JISC Future of Research conference. You can see her blog post from that event to see what was used for amplification of the event, and if you’re interested in knowing more about event amplification you may want to subscribe to her blog.

I see a lot of tweets and blog posts from some of my network about the level of tweeting going on at the conference and the amplification of the event – are the organisers geared up to support amplification? Is it more of a closed event? Are people frowned upon for tweeting or is a hashtag publicised and tweeting encouraged? I personally haven’t experienced any negativity towards my tweeting or amplification, but I know of many who have, and I have had a few “Ohhhh, you were tweeting from your phone?! I thought you were just texting!” conversations.

There’s a lot of different angles to consider with event amplification (amplifier/organiser/follower), so I’m going to split my thought and some tips from my own experience into a few blog posts which I will post over the next couple of weeks or so:

– Event amplification: using social media to amplify an event
– Event amplification: supporting amplification of events
– Event amplification: following an amplified event

Look out for the posts soon which I keep adding to and will publish over the next couple of weeks.

  • New Blog Post: Event Amplification: what’s it all about? http://joeyanne.co.uk/2010/10/28/eve

  • New Blog Post: Event Amplification: what’s it all about? http://joeyanne.co.uk/2010/10/28/eve

  • Hi Jo

    I am looking forward to your blogs on ‘how to’ as, inspired by you and your colleagues at #libdebate, I am bringing social media to a cross sector event in Dudley in 3 weeks time. It feels like a bit of a first for Dudley, unless I’ve been missing something.

    I’ve already put the hastag on the event info, and plan a twitterfall, have tweeters lined up, buy feel I need to be clear about why I am doing all this. If you’re not likely to touch on this perhaps I should blog about it!

    Cheers
    Lorna

    • Hi Lorna, thanks for your comment. I’m delighted to hear that you are planning to use Twitter to amplify your event. I think it definitely deserves a blog post too as I’m sure you will cover some of the things I might forget!