CILIP Revalidation Hints & Tips

CILIP Revalidation Hints & Tips series

This post is part of a series of blog posts I’m writing about CILIP Revalidation. Last year I worked with CILIP as a Future Skills Project Worker on a part-time secondment basis helping develop CILIP’s Professional Registration (Certification, Chartership, Fellowship and Revalidation). I went on to use the new process to successfully revalidate my CILIP Chartership earlier this year, and am sharing my experience through a series of blog posts. For other posts in the series, see the Revalidation Hints & Tips series.

The final stage in the Revalidation process is to put together your CPD log and supporting statement, and submit it. This is all done via the CILIP VLE. If you’ve been recording your CPD throughout the year in the CPD log in CILIP Portfolio (see my post on Recording your CPD), and have your supporting statement written (see my post on Writing your supporting statement) this stage won’t take long at all. Read the rest of this entry »

CILIP Revalidation Hints & Tips

CILIP Revalidation Hints & Tips series

This post is part of a series of blog posts I’m writing about CILIP Revalidation. Last year I worked with CILIP as a Future Skills Project Worker on a part-time secondment basis helping develop CILIP’s Professional Registration (Certification, Chartership, Fellowship and Revalidation). I went on to use the new process to successfully revalidate my CILIP Chartership earlier this year, and am sharing my experience through a series of blog posts. For other posts in the series, see the Revalidation Hints & Tips series.

There are two parts to CILIP Revalidation; your log of CPD activities, and your supporting statement. The supporting statement is your opportunity to explain and reflect on your CPD activities. You only have 250 words, so you have to be fairly concise. Read the rest of this entry »

CILIP Revalidation Hints & Tips

CILIP Revalidation Hints & Tips series

This post is part of a series of blog posts I’m writing about CILIP Revalidation. Last year I worked with CILIP as a Future Skills Project Worker on a part-time secondment basis helping develop CILIP’s Professional Registration (Certification, Chartership, Fellowship and Revalidation). I went on to use the new process to successfully revalidate my CILIP Chartership earlier this year, and am sharing my experience through a series of blog posts. For other posts in the series, see the Revalidation Hints & Tips series.

The first part of Revalidation is completing 20 hours of professional development, or CPD (Continuing Professional Development) as it’s commonly referred to. The guidelines suggest that this would be on a roughly annual basis, though it may take slightly longer (or a lot less!). Read the rest of this entry »

CILIP Revalidation Hints & Tips

CILIP Revalidation Hints & Tips

Earlier this year I successfully revalidated my CILIP Chartership. Having been involved in developing the new scheme for CILIP Professional Registration (which incorporates Certification, Chartership, Fellowship, and Revalidation) during my part-time secondment at CILIP last year, I was keen to put what I had learnt into practice and test whether Revalidation was as straight forward as we’d hoped. I spent quite a bit of time examining Revalidation in other professional organisations, and it was evident that the previous version of CILIP Revalidation was much more involved than comparators. The message from member feedback (which also reflected my own personal view) was clear – Revalidation needed to be simplified so that it could be completed on a more regular basis to demonstrate an ongoing commitment to professional development (after all, the C in CPD is for continuing professional development). With that in mind, we set out to make the process less intensive and more relevant to all levels of Professional Registration – Certification, Chartership, and Fellowship (previously the focus had been more as a step up from Chartership).

As I’ve now been through the Revalidation process and have discussed it with a number of people planning to do the same, I thought it might be worthwhile me documenting the processes I used (and intend to continue to use) in case they are useful for others. I’ll therefore be publishing a series of blog posts over the next few days, including:

I’ll be writing about my own experience which relates to revalidating CILIP Chartership, but much of the processes apply to those revalidating CILIP Certification or CILIP Fellowship. If you have any questions, please let me know in the blog comments. I hope you find this series useful.

Another year has flown past and it’s time for my annual review – you can see previous ones for 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012.

2013 has been a funny old year; nothing particularly terrible has happened, but I haven’t felt as positive as I usually do and this has been reflected by a decrease in blogging and use of social media. It’s not all bad though, as another reason for this decrease is a continuation of what I mentioned last year as a major lesson – trying to achieve a more sustainable work-life balance. This year I’ve been doing a lot of other hobbies – for some months I was regularly running, I’ve been learning nail art (and building quite a large collection of nail polishes!), I’ve learnt to crochet, and I’ve been doing lots of knitting. Oh, and I’ve become a little addicted to Grey’s Anatomy. There have also been some professional achievements during the year, so I’m going to take the opportunity to highlight those as I have done in previous years.

2013 highlights

2013 highlights

Top left: Entering the CILIP offices for the final day of my secondment
Top right: Attendees at one of my CILIP Umbrella Conference breakout sessions
Bottom left: One of my CILIP Update columns
Bottom right: Lean In book by Sheryl Sandberg (image from Google Books)

One major thing this year has been my part-time secondment to CILIP for the Future Skills Project. Between May and November, two days of my working week were spent on the project along with another project worker, Julie Griffiths. Our focus was to work on the recommendations from the Future Skills project board to prepare for the launch of the new Professional Registration (previously referred to as CILIP Qualifications). We worked on the assessment criteria, the assessment process, the handbooks, and online support materials for Certification, Chartership, Fellowship, and Revalidation. For revalidation we reviewed the process and made it much more straight forward to submit on an annual basis, rather than a large portfolio every 3 years. We also provided training for a number of specific groups related to Professional Registration – the Professional Registration Assessment Board, Mentor Support Officers, and Candidate Support Officers. After a successful member vote in November, the new scheme has now launched and people are starting to use it. I hope they find it clearer than the previous system, and I know CILIP staff will be working hard to support everyone involved to make it a relatively smooth transition. The project was really interesting to work on, and totally different from my day job; the variety was good for me, and I enjoyed working with lots of different CILIP members. It was also really good to get to know more of the CILIP staff, who are lovely and made myself and Julie feel very welcome. I feel honoured to have been able to work on the project and the experience has certainly been a highlight of my year.

Towards the end of last year, I made a conscious decision to not attend as many conferences in 2013 as I had in 2012. This was a tough decision; I absolutely love conferences and learn so much from them, both through the sessions I attend and the conversations I have with people I meet at conferences. However, I find them pretty draining, particularly when I have a presentation to prepare for and deliver (though I love doing it and it is a really important part of my role as a researcher). I knew though that attending too many conferences could reach a stage where it impacts on my work, as it’s not just the time out at the conference, but the preparation time before and reflection time after. I knew I needed to prioritise so that I wasn’t spending as much time outside working hours doing activities relating to conferences.

I decided to only submit proposals for CILIP Umbrella Conference, which is a conference I’ve never been able to attend previously. I was delighted to discover that both my proposals had been successful, though of course that meant quite a bit of work ahead of me. I was very fortunate to be working with two fantastic co-presenters who made the whole process enjoyable, and I really enjoyed the conference. The keynotes were excellent as no matter what sector you work in, there was something to take from them all. I also really enjoyed a leadership panel discussion I attended, and breakout sessions on continuing professional development.

I was invited to present at other events, and although I couldn’t fit them all into my schedule, I was able to accept some and really enjoyed the opportunity to speak about topics that interest me. I presented workshops on tools and techniques to improve productivity; getting the most out of professional development; using mobile technologies in libraries; and at Internet Librarian International I was invited to share my experiences as a learner on a MOOC (see my previous blog post for further information on MOOCs). You can see a full list of the presentations I gave in 2013 on my Presentations page.

Another highlight of 2013 for me has been writing a column for CILIP Update. This followed on from an article I wrote for the magazine in 2012 on the Getting Things Done methodology, and this year I have written tips and advice on a number of different themes to do with improving productivity. I received some really positive feedback on the column and know some people have found the ideas useful in changing their own practice. I’ve drafted a blog post to summarise the key points from the column and will share that soon – in the meantime, the columns are available from my Publications page.

Something else I’ve enjoyed in 2013 is the Library Leadership Reading Group (LLRG). I started this after the CILIP in Wales 2012 conference on leadership, and since then have hosted discussions on ten different readings relating to leadership. I’ve found the discussions really useful – sometimes I haven’t really enjoyed reading the book but after the discussion have taken more from it due to other people’s perspectives after reading it. I’ve been tending to create a Storify of each discussion and you can see them linked from the LLRG Google document. At the moment we’re reading a book on change management, Our Iceberg is Melting, which we’re likely to discuss in January. Keep an eye on the #llrg tag on Twitter if you’re interested in joining us, everyone is welcome. One particular highlight of LLRG for me this year has been reading Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg. I absolutely loved it and it has had a huge influence on my life. I’ve discussed parts of the book with so many different people, and continue to think about some of the things mentioned in the book when I have to make decisions. I’ve also become part of a Lean In circle which has been a very positive experience for me.

So there we go, my personal highlights for the year. I hope you have enjoyed 2013, and whether or not you celebrate New Year I hope you have the opportunity to mark the beginning of 2014 in some way. I’m looking forward to a fresh start, beginning with a potential break of tradition (something I very rarely do!). First though, I shall be trying some new cocktails tonight including the one below – cheers!

I’ve been working for CILIP in my part-time secondment role for the Future Skills project for a couple of months now and we’re making good progress. I’ve had a number of people ask questions about where things are at and what will be happening when, as well as people wanting to provide feedback to help shape the support for the new Professional Registration. I thought it would therefore be worthwhile to share where we’re up to at this point, what else will be done, and where you can help.

Julie and myself first worked on the assessment criteria, and have refined those with help from members of the CILIP CPD team and the CILIP Qualifications Board (soon to change their name to the Professional Registration and Accreditation Board). We got feedback from some candidates, mentors and candidate support officers, made some minor tweaks, and then launched the criteria at the beginning of this month at CILIP Umbrella. I spoke to some people about them and the general feedback so far is that they’re much clearer and show progression from one level to the next. Thank goodness – that’s certainly what we were aiming for!

Following that, we began to consider the process and detail of each of the levels of Professional Registration (Certification, Chartership and Fellowship) as well as Revalidation. Again we met with members of the CILIP CPD team and the CILIP Qualifications Board to address the current issues with each level and what we could do to address them or make guidance clearer. It has been really useful to get the perspective from the assessors – they’re the ones who know where people fall down on their applications so hopefully we can help provide guidance to reduce this. We were also able to observe a Qualifications Board meeting which was really interesting and gave us that broader understanding to feed into our work. The assessment process is being streamlined in the new scheme (at the moment it’s a complex process). It’s been very reassuring to learn about the process and the way applications are handled – I had no idea there was so much to it! We’re working on the handbooks now that we have agreed decisions on things like word count, format, and processes, and we’re currently collecting feedback from a group of users on the first drafts to help ensure the handbooks are fit for purpose.

One of our next priorities is working on training and support. We’re collecting examples of best practice in terms of the training that has been provided around CILIP qualifications in order for us to make some recommendations for future training on professional registration. Last week we launched a short survey to help us with that. If you have received training as a candidate, mentor, candidate support officer or mentor support officer, please help us by sharing your thoughts in our survey. It will only take a few minutes to complete and is available until Friday 26th July at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/cfstbp.

We’re also looking at the content for the website, much of which will supplement the handbooks. This will include information on elements of Professional Registration to use in practice – things like mentoring (from the perspective of a mentor and a mentee), reflective practice, and development planning. We’re hoping to collect some case studies to share on the website too. In the first stages, we’re looking for case studies from those who have completed Certification, Chartership or Fellowship so if you would like to be contribute to that please contact jo.alcock2@cilip.org.uk.

If you’re interested in knowing more about the key changes for Professional Registration, or would like further guidance about what this means for you, please visit the page on the CILIP website: http://www.cilip.org.uk/cilip/jobs-careers/professional-registration/professional-registration/important-messages-about

I’ve recently started a part-time secondment to CILIP to work on their Future Skills Project. You may already be aware of the project, which has been working on the recommendations from the Defining our Professional Future report to review the CPD offering:

The Future Skills Project is reviewing CILIP’s qualifications to ensure every member gets the recognition they deserve from their employers and society for a unique suite of highly valuable, relevant and endurable skills.

This review has created the Professional Knowledge and Skills Base (PKSB), the revised model for delivering Accreditation of academic and vocational qualifications and the suite of CILIP qualifications.

The two Future Skills Project Workers (one of whom is myself), are now working on preparing the material to support Professional Registration (i.e. Certification, Chartership, Fellowship, and Revalidation). We’ll be working on the recommendations from the project board and the information collected during the project (focus groups, surveys, etc.) but I’d like to pose a few of my own, more specific, questions to ensure what we produce is relevant and useful to current candidates and potential candidates. One of the first tasks I’m working on is thinking about what information needs to be in the handbooks provided by CILIP to guide you through the qualifications (see the current Certification handbook, Chartership handbook, Fellowship handbook and Revalidation handbook). I’d be interested in your views – please feel free to respond to any or all of these questions by commenting on the blog post or you can email me directly.

If you are currently working towards a CILIP qualification or have recently completed one:

What information in the handbook or on the CILIP website did you find useful in helping you complete your qualification?

Were there any resources outside of the handbook that you found useful? (e.g. book chapters, websites, articles, blog posts etc.) What did you find so useful about them?

Was there anything missing or unclear from the handbook?

What guidance would you have liked to see and in what format? (For example, we’ve seen mention of things like flowcharts for the process from start to finish, checklists of what you need to do and when – what would you have found useful?)

If you have considered a CILIP qualification:

Did you read the handbook? What did you think? Was there anything else you would have liked to know?

If you chose not to work towards the qualification, was there any information (or lack of) which contributed to your decision?

I’ll be working on the Future Skills project for the next three months and may well be asking for more feedback on things along the way, but if you have any comments or suggestions at any point, please email me. We really want to make sure that what we produce is clear, easy to understand and genuinely useful.